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Youth Justice Project launch event

Saturday, November 3, 2018
4-6PM: Spoken Word Poetry, Art, and More, Organized by Morpheus Youth Project
6-8PM: Film Screening: Perception: From Prison to Purpose and Panel Discussion
First Unitarian Portland, 1011 SW 12th Avenue, Portland, OR 97205

SUPPORT THE OJRC THROUGH THE 2018 GIVE!GUIDE
THIS IS A GIVE!GUIDE EVENT!

The OJRC is committed to reducing the criminalization and incarceration of young people, particularly youth from disenfranchised communities. Youth in Oregon are vulnerable to automatic involvement in the adult criminal justice system from as young as 15 years old. Oregon is one of the highest incarcerators of youth remanded to the adult system in the United States and also has the dubious distinction of being one of only a few states that continue to sentence juvenile offenders to life without the possibility of parole.

The punitive "tough on crime" response to youth crime and  misbehavior does not work. Youth should not be subjected to mandatory minimum sentences and should always have a meaningful opportunity for earned release. We must recognize and accept that young people are still  developing and should be given opportunities for treatment,  rehabilitation, habilitation, and positive reinforcement. Ending  excessive sentences and extreme punishments of youth is of the utmost  importance to protect young people in the justice system and our wider  communities.

The OJRC launched its Youth Justice Project (YJP) in the summer of 2018 with the goal of having a program in Oregon that is solely dedicated to taking a holistic approach to addressing the systemic flaws in Oregon’s treatment of youth in the adult system. Visit the YJP webpage to learn more about the Youth Justice Project, to sign-up to our youth justice focused newsletter, and to meet the YJP team.

We have a fun, informative, and engaging launch event planned: spoken word poetry, art, a film screening, and a panel discussion.

Please join us to hear from youth who have been through Oregon's criminal justice system and the impact it is had on them. Importantly, come and learn about what changes we need to make to ensure that Oregon's youth are treated fairly:

  • 4PM: Spoken Word Poetry, Art, and Community Engagement, organized by Morpheus Youth Project

  • 6PM: Film Screening: Perception: From Prison to Purpose (panel discussion to follow)

Suggested donation of $25, $45, or $65. All proceeds will be split with the Morpheus Youth Project and to provide stipends to all individuals (artists and panelists) participating in the event.

DUE TO LIMITED SPACE, REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED, or

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about the film
Perception: From Prison to Purpose

 
 
Adversity is our biggest asset. Once you understand that, you have taken your power back.
— Noah Schultz

In 2009, at 17 years old, Noah Schultz was arrested for attempted murder, sentenced under Measure 11, and incarcerated for seven years.

Pushed to better himself and challenge perceptions of what it means to be an inmate, Noah took full advantage of rehabilitation programs, workshops, and educational services.

With determination and spirit he has gone "from gang member, drug dealer, and prisoner, to college graduate, author, and TEDx speaker."

Building on his success, he continues to advocate for programs in youth correctional facilities, and hopes to achieve reform of our nation’s prison systems.

While the story of one man's triumph against the odds is undoubtedly uplifting, it's important that we don't lose sight of the larger systemic issues that Noah's story reveals.

Earlier this year, we published a report called "Youth and Measure 11 in Oregon: Impacts of Mandatory Minimums" in collaboration with the Oregon Council on Civil Rights. The report examines the effects Measure 11 has had on Oregon youth in the years since it was passed. It reviews the latest scientific understanding of brain development, legal changes that have prompted many states to overhaul their youth sentencing laws, personal experiences of young people who are currently serving Measure 11 sentences, and analysis of data on Measure 11's impact, including its disparate impact on youth of color.

To speak to these issues, we're bringing together a panel of individuals with lived experience of Measure 11 and Oregon’s criminal justice system to answer your questions about how the law is affecting young people in our state. Panelists include (and more to be announced soon, stay tuned!):

 
  NOAH SCHULTZ  is a social innovator, youth advocate and public speaker from Portland, Oregon, who is passionate about bringing services to underprivileged youth. Having served seven-and-a-half years in prison he has a personal connection and motivation to drive reform in our justice system through humanizing the stories of the incarcerated and raising awareness around mass incarceration. He is co-owner of Forgotten Culture Clothing, co-founder of Verbal Escape and subject of the award winning documentary "Perception: Prison to Purpose."

NOAH SCHULTZ is a social innovator, youth advocate and public speaker from Portland, Oregon, who is passionate about bringing services to underprivileged youth. Having served seven-and-a-half years in prison he has a personal connection and motivation to drive reform in our justice system through humanizing the stories of the incarcerated and raising awareness around mass incarceration. He is co-owner of Forgotten Culture Clothing, co-founder of Verbal Escape and subject of the award winning documentary "Perception: Prison to Purpose."

  TREVOR WALRAVEN  is Co-Founder and Co-Director of OJRC’s Youth Justice Project. Trevor is a formerly incarcerated youth offender who served almost 18 years in correctional facilities starting at age 14. In February 2016, Trevor successfully proved outstanding rehabilitation and reformation under Oregon’s "Second Look" statute. He was the second juvenile lifer to be released under Second Look. While incarcerated, Trevor was the youngest elected president of the Oregon State Penitentiary Lifers Unlimited Club. He led Oregon’s  Inside/Out Think Tank  which trains Oregon professors to teach Inside/Out around the globe and oversees Inside/Out classes in Oregon. Since his release, Trevor has spoken at many of Oregon’s institutions including universities, correctional facilities, and advocacy organizations about the experience growing up in the state's criminal justice system.

TREVOR WALRAVEN is Co-Founder and Co-Director of OJRC’s Youth Justice Project. Trevor is a formerly incarcerated youth offender who served almost 18 years in correctional facilities starting at age 14. In February 2016, Trevor successfully proved outstanding rehabilitation and reformation under Oregon’s "Second Look" statute. He was the second juvenile lifer to be released under Second Look. While incarcerated, Trevor was the youngest elected president of the Oregon State Penitentiary Lifers Unlimited Club. He led Oregon’s Inside/Out Think Tank which trains Oregon professors to teach Inside/Out around the globe and oversees Inside/Out classes in Oregon. Since his release, Trevor has spoken at many of Oregon’s institutions including universities, correctional facilities, and advocacy organizations about the experience growing up in the state's criminal justice system.

 

CO-PRESENTEr

 
  Morpheus Youth Project builds healthy communities for young people thru arts and culturally responsive activities.   The purpose of the  Morpheus Youth Project  is to create an accessible, safe and respectful environment that encourages positive growth and provides creative opportunities through the arts and humanities. We believe that by investing in our youth through education and encouraging the development of self-awareness, we will provide viable tools and positive options for young people as they mature.

Morpheus Youth Project builds healthy communities for young people thru arts and culturally responsive activities.

The purpose of the Morpheus Youth Project is to create an accessible, safe and respectful environment that encourages positive growth and provides creative opportunities through the arts and humanities. We believe that by investing in our youth through education and encouraging the development of self-awareness, we will provide viable tools and positive options for young people as they mature.

 

Sponsors

 
  “Ending the New Jim Crow”A Social Justice Action Group of First Unitarian Church, Portland

“Ending the New Jim Crow”A Social Justice Action Group of First Unitarian Church, Portland