Perception: From Prison to Purpose


Documentary screening and panel discussion about the impact of Measure 11 on Oregon youth

Tuesday, April 10th

7 pm

WHITSELL AUDITORIUM, 1219 SW Park ave., portland, or 97205

CO-PRESENTED with the NW Film Center


Measure 11 and oregon youth

In 1994, Oregon voters approved Ballot Measure 11, a mandatory minimum sentencing law that came into force in 1995. Anyone convicted under the law has to serve the whole of their sentence, with no reduction for good behavior. Under Measure 11, children as young as 15 can be tried, convicted, and sentenced as though they were adults. Today, Oregon incarcerates young people at a higher rate than almost every other state in the country, and our state has the second highest rate of transfers of young people to adult court in the nation.

In collaboration with the Oregon Council on Civil Rights, we produced a report (published February 2018) called "Youth and Measure 11: Impacts of Mandatory Minimums." The report examines the effects Measure 11 has had on Oregon youth in the years since it was passed. It reviews the latest scientific understanding of brain development, legal changes that have prompted many states to overhaul their youth sentencing laws, personal experiences of young people who are currently serving Measure 11 sentences, and analysis of data on Measure 11's impact. To read the report click here.

Perception: From Prison to Purpose

In 2009, at 17 years old, Noah Schultz was arrested for attempted murder, sentenced under Measure 11, and incarcerated for seven years.

Pushed to better himself and challenge perceptions of what it means to be an inmate, Noah took full advantage of rehabilitation programs, workshops, and educational services.

With determination and spirit he has gone "from gang member, drug dealer, and prisoner, to college graduate, author, and TEDx speaker."

Building on his success, he continues to advocate for programs in youth correctional facilities, and hopes to achieve reform of our nation’s prison systems.

OUR PANEL

  STEPHEN FOWLER  is a performing artist, activist, justice advocate, and community educator. Convicted as a teen and sentenced to 7.5 years at the Oregon Youth Authority, Stephen used his time to expand his understanding of self-worth, potential, and purpose using art forms. Stephen is committed to educating community members, teachers, law enforcement, parents, and students about the practice of restorative justice for community rehabilitation and showing adolescents the power of their own voice. He is a co-founder of Verbal Escape, an employee of Resolutions Northwest, Black Educational Achievement Movement, and is affiliated with Morpheus Youth Projects.

STEPHEN FOWLER is a performing artist, activist, justice advocate, and community educator. Convicted as a teen and sentenced to 7.5 years at the Oregon Youth Authority, Stephen used his time to expand his understanding of self-worth, potential, and purpose using art forms. Stephen is committed to educating community members, teachers, law enforcement, parents, and students about the practice of restorative justice for community rehabilitation and showing adolescents the power of their own voice. He is a co-founder of Verbal Escape, an employee of Resolutions Northwest, Black Educational Achievement Movement, and is affiliated with Morpheus Youth Projects.

  DR. ALISHA MORELAND-CAPUIA , MD, is the executive director of the Avel Gordly Center for Healing, and assistant professor of Public Psychiatry at OHSU. She earned a B.S. from Stanford University and an M.D. from The George Washington University and completed four years of training in psychiatry and a fellowship in addiction medicine, both at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). She is the first African-American native Oregonian to become a licensed and board-certified psychiatrist and was a  Portland Business Journal  2016 ’40 Under 40′ honoree. She is co-founder of The Capuia Foundation (a nonprofit established to improve access to healthcare, education, and agriculture in Angola).

DR. ALISHA MORELAND-CAPUIA, MD, is the executive director of the Avel Gordly Center for Healing, and assistant professor of Public Psychiatry at OHSU. She earned a B.S. from Stanford University and an M.D. from The George Washington University and completed four years of training in psychiatry and a fellowship in addiction medicine, both at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). She is the first African-American native Oregonian to become a licensed and board-certified psychiatrist and was a Portland Business Journal 2016 ’40 Under 40′ honoree. She is co-founder of The Capuia Foundation (a nonprofit established to improve access to healthcare, education, and agriculture in Angola).

  KASIA RUTLEDGE  is a capital defense lawyer defending people facing the death penalty. For almost ten years prior to that, she represented poor people accused of major felonies in Multnomah and Washington counties at Metropolitan Public Defenders (MPD). Kasia fights to protect her client's rights using a client-centered focus, storytelling, and education of the public about the struggles of the people she is honored to represent. She also facilitates anti-racism and anti-oppression trainings, mentors students and new lawyers, and fights daily to change the criminal justice system.

KASIA RUTLEDGE is a capital defense lawyer defending people facing the death penalty. For almost ten years prior to that, she represented poor people accused of major felonies in Multnomah and Washington counties at Metropolitan Public Defenders (MPD). Kasia fights to protect her client's rights using a client-centered focus, storytelling, and education of the public about the struggles of the people she is honored to represent. She also facilitates anti-racism and anti-oppression trainings, mentors students and new lawyers, and fights daily to change the criminal justice system.

  NOAH SCHULTZ  is a social innovator, youth advocate and public speaker from Portland, Oregon, who is passionate about bringing services to underprivileged youth. Having served seven-and-a-half years in prison he has a personal connection and motivation to drive reform in our justice system through humanizing the stories of the incarcerated and raising awareness around mass incarceration. He is co-owner of Forgotten Culture Clothing, co-founder of Verbal Escape and subject of the award winning documentary "Perception: Prison to Purpose."

NOAH SCHULTZ is a social innovator, youth advocate and public speaker from Portland, Oregon, who is passionate about bringing services to underprivileged youth. Having served seven-and-a-half years in prison he has a personal connection and motivation to drive reform in our justice system through humanizing the stories of the incarcerated and raising awareness around mass incarceration. He is co-owner of Forgotten Culture Clothing, co-founder of Verbal Escape and subject of the award winning documentary "Perception: Prison to Purpose."

  BOBBIN SINGH (MODERATOR)  is the founding Executive Director of the Oregon Justice Resource Center and a member of the Oregon Council on Civil Rights. The organizations collaborated to produce the report: "Youth and Measure 11: Impacts of Mandatory Minimums." Bobbin was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, and was deeply inspired by the great figures of the civil rights movement in the South. He argues that for individual rights to have any meaning, we must protect them for everyone, without exception.

BOBBIN SINGH (MODERATOR) is the founding Executive Director of the Oregon Justice Resource Center and a member of the Oregon Council on Civil Rights. The organizations collaborated to produce the report: "Youth and Measure 11: Impacts of Mandatory Minimums." Bobbin was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, and was deeply inspired by the great figures of the civil rights movement in the South. He argues that for individual rights to have any meaning, we must protect them for everyone, without exception.

  ROBERT WHITE  committed a Burglary and Robbery at 17 and took a plea for 61 months. About a year before release, he became a member of a Youth Council under the Juvenile Justice Strategy Group of The Annie E. Casey Foundation. He is serving a second term on the Council and continues to educate himself on the system while following his goals of helping change policies in Oregon and becoming a motivational speaker talking to troubled youth about choices and overcoming obstacles. Robert recently joined Portland Opportunities Industrialization Center + Rosemary Anderson High School as a Professional Mentor in the Community Healing Initiative program.

ROBERT WHITE committed a Burglary and Robbery at 17 and took a plea for 61 months. About a year before release, he became a member of a Youth Council under the Juvenile Justice Strategy Group of The Annie E. Casey Foundation. He is serving a second term on the Council and continues to educate himself on the system while following his goals of helping change policies in Oregon and becoming a motivational speaker talking to troubled youth about choices and overcoming obstacles. Robert recently joined Portland Opportunities Industrialization Center + Rosemary Anderson High School as a Professional Mentor in the Community Healing Initiative program.

CO-PRESENTED BY THE