Amicus Project

 

The OJRC's mission is to dismantle systemic discrimination in the administration of justice by promoting civil rights and enhancing the quality of legal representation for traditionally underserved communities. Our work is rooted in the understanding that one of our greatest challenges and the civil rights issue of our time is the representation of those individuals who are accused of crimes and wrongfully or unfairly incarcerated in our prisons.  In so doing, we recognize that the population of incarcerated persons in Oregon and nationwide is overwhelmingly poor and disproportionately comprised of people of color.

 The Amicus Curiae Project mission is to provide amicus assistance on the state level in cases that present significant social justice issues that are related to criminal defense, civil rights, juvenile justice, or are of particular importance to traditionally underserved communities.

 As part of its mission to advance civil rights and liberties through advocacy, the OJRC will be engaged in drafting, as well as signing on to, amicus briefs on cutting-edge social justice issues facing the courts.  In this effort, the OJRC is particularly committed to dismantling systemic discrimination in the administration of justice by promoting civil liberties and enhancing the quality of legal representation to traditionally underserved communities. 

An amicus curiae ("friend of the court") brief is an important way for the Oregon Justice Resource Center to contribute its analysis of important but undeveloped aspects of critical cases.

If you are in the process of litigating a case and you would like the OJRC to submit an amicus brief on your behalf, please send your request to info@ojrc.org. There is no guarantee that we will be able to or will want to write a brief for each submission, but we will review all submissions to see if the cases in question warrant our attention.

Please provide a short memo summarizing the following:

a. Case name (full name of the parties) and number. 
b. Procedural posture.
c. Briefing schedule/calendar (actual and possible extensions).
d. Summary of facts.
e. Summary of issue(s) that the OJRC should weigh-in on.
f.  Name and contact information of attorneys: trial, appellate, PCR
g. Misc. considerations. 

Email your memo as an attached word document to info@ojrc.org

 OJRC Lawyers' Committee: The Lawyers’ Committee is authorized to determine that OJRC will participate as amicus.

  • Lindsey Burrows, Co-Chair
  • Sara Werboff. Co-Chair
  • Shauna Curphey
  • Elizabeth Daily
  • Emily Elison
  • Jordan Silk
  • Alex Wheatley

The OJRC has submitted the following briefs:

  1. Oregon v. DeLong (Article I, Section 12) 
  2. Miguel Cabrera-Cruz v. Oregon (ICE Detainers)
  3. Oregon v. Hickman (via Oregon Innocence Project, Eyewitness Identification)
  4. Oregon v. Johnson (via Oregon Innocence Project, "Knowing" Waiver and Access to DNA Testing)
  5. Jose Antonio Gonzalez Verduzco v. Oregon (What rule should Oregon courts apply in post-conviction proceedings to determine whether redress will be available for violations of the constitutional right recognized in Padilla v. Kentucky, to be adequately advised by counsel as to the immigration consequences of a criminal conviction?)
  6. Oregon v. Prieto-Rubio (Under Article I, section 11, of the Oregon Constitution, when may police question an incarcerated individual who is represented by counsel?)